Is your family affected by autism? Many are finding that their autistic child or adult responds positively to sound therapy, neuro-scientific programming in which filtered frequencies are applied to the brain through specially recorded music. autism awareness month jpgOver time, sound therapy causes new synapses to form, improving the brain in specific, deficient areas.

As you may know from reading this website, I am an Integrated Listening Systems sound therapy provider. iLs’ new program, the Safe and Sound Protocol (SSP), is a 5-day program, one hour each day, which parent and child can do at home with SSP equipment/music (a rental from Austin Learning Solutions). The Safe and Sound Protocol is being used with autistic spectrum clients and has also shown very good results for children and adults with anxiety.

Dr. Stephen Porges designed the SSP to calm the autonomic nervous system. This calming effect brings balance to disregulated emotional and physiological systems, allowing the child to feel safe. The “fight or flight” response is diminished, enabling the Social Engagement System to open up. The child’s ability to communicate and interact with family and others can progress. This enhances the efficiency of following therapies.

You may read more about the Safe and Sound Protocol here: http://integratedlistening.com/ssp-safe-sound-protocol/.

Be sure to read David's story (a student with Down Syndrome), on the same SSP page. Clinical use of the Safe and Sound Protocol is showing great results for both autistic and non-autistic clients. This link shows two columns about Pre- and Post-SSP state: http://integratedlistening.com/ssp-safe-sound-protocol-clinical-resources/.

Hope this is helpful! Please forward this to someone you know who may benefit from the Safe and Sound Protocol.

Most mothers save Valentines from their children, I’ll bet, and I found a sweet one today.

hearts dyslexia

I share this with you, parents of my students who have varying challenges, because of its priceless expression of love and of the creativity of dyslexia. Challenged children have gifts to develop and share with the world!

Fox, the child with dyslexia who created this for his mother, Rebecca Warren, is a little older now. In 2012, Rebecca initiated the Virginia chapter of Decoding Dyslexia, a national organization.

A sweet Valentines Day to you all!

dyslexie font 3The month of October honors people with dyslexia, to promote awareness of this affliction which can also be a gift. Yes, with the many children and adults I have met and worked with, I have seen giftedness in different areas, particularly in the spatial arts, such as drawing, creating freehand magnificent structures from plastic building blocks, and engineering.

The Dyslexie font, which was created by The Netherlands’ Christian Boer as his final thesis in graphic design for Utrecht Art Academy.  He sought to make life easier for anyone with reading problems. Boer designed the Dyslexie typeface with specific changes which makes it easier for dyslexic readers to distinguish between troublesome letters (such as b, d, p, and q) and even to be able to see punctuation more easily.

You can see examples of dyslexie and download the font (free of charge for home use) here: dyslexiefont.com

I’ll send you to the website now, so you may explore for yourself.

dyslexie font 1     dyslexie font 2 

dyslexie font

 

Recent neuroscientific breakthroughs provide insights into therapeutic means of rewiring our brains. Neuroplasticity is the ability for our brains to change their structure and function by creating out new pathways—such as by learning new ideas and skills—and strengthening these pathways through repetition and practice. Our neurons process and transmit information through electrical and chemical signals that pass across synapses, small gaps between neurons. The infographic below from Alta Mira, a San Francisco-area rehabilitation and recovery center, explains how neuroplasticity works.

New research has revealed that neuron production can continue throughout a human life span. Neuroscientists have discovered effective ways to guide the process of neuronal growth and to repair areas of the brain that are slowed by developmental delays or are damaged by injury. Cognitive training or brain conditioning can help repair these areas of the brain to change addictive behaviors and improve information processing, motor function, memory, language skills, problem solving, and more.

Rewiring the Brain Infographic

Our children's developing brains need strong moral input in order to grow well-ordered lives. Logical moral boundaries seem to have crashed in our culture, and today's children get much of their information/attitudes about morality and sex from popular media. Children may learn about sex on the playground or even from novels assigned at school. They may hear nothing about it from parents until "The Talk", which may come too late and be awkward.  

On the other hand, many parents are taking a proactive approach, using purchased sex education curriculum. Close friends recommended a series, God's Design for Sex.

This series has four books written for ages 3 to 5, 5 to 8, 8 to 11 and 11-14.  When their older child's school offered sex education last year, her parents pulled her out for those lessons and used the appropriate age level book to teach at home instead. All their children have enjoyed reading and rereading their age-level books in this series.

Also recommended as "very good" was a book for parents: How and When to Tell Your Kids About Sex: A Lifelong Approach to Shaping Your Child's Sexual Character

Hope this is helpful, as we start a new year, full of promise!

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  ann@austinlearningsolutions.com

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     Austin, Texas 78746

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